What Will A White Christmas Look Like In 2050?

Let’s face it: the world is rapidly changing, both environmentally and technologically. I remember Christmas as a child, where we had weeks of thick, chunky, crunchy snow. However, in my teens and twenties, I hardly ever saw the white stuff until February, and nowadays, it’s not unusual to see snow in March!

With 2020 just around the corner, this has got a lot of people online talking about Christmas in 2050. What will it look like? How modern will our world be? I wouldn’t be surprised if by this time, a virtual reality Santa Claus will be seen flying through the sky! Which come to think of it, how bloomin’ amazing would that be?!

During my research into this fascinating area, I also saw some thought provoking assumptions that relate to how technology will play a part when it comes to preparing the Christmas dinner, the guests, and even the decorations! I found this article online by Viessmann super interesting and got me thinking about a futuristic Christmas. I mean, imagine it – AR Christmas crackers and virtual guests turning up in the home!

It’s also got me researching into snowfall changes in the last decade, as well as predictions for December snowfall in 2050.

I recently received a press release in which their data shows the number of December snow days from the last decade in 40 cities, as well as projections for 2050.

Take a read below for some insight and predication surrounding the snowfall, contributing to a ‘White Christmas’

Helsinki, Finland had the biggest decline in December snow days, from an average of 13 days between 2009 – 2013, to 6 days between 2014 – 2018. Projections show that Helsinki’s December snow days could be down to 2 by 2050.

Toronto, Canada had the biggest increase in December snow days, from an average of 3 days between 2009 – 2013, to 6 days between 2014 – 2018. Predictions show that Toronto’s December snow days could be back down to 3 by 2050.

Montreal, St. Petersburg, Kiev, and Oslo are all predicted to have 6 (or more) fewer days of December snow by 2050, as compared to 2009 – 201

Berlin, Germany, December, 2019—A study revealing December snow days from the last ten years, as well as projections for 2050, has been released by apartment aggregator, Nestpick.com. Weather is one of the key elements that attracts people to a certain city, so Nestpick have a keen interest in how climates are predicted to change in the future. With the festive season fast approaching, Nestpick’s Berlin-based team started discussing how there hasn’t been a White Christmas in years, which prompted a question: Has snowfall in December changed in the past decade, and how will it look in the future?

Predictions of potential snowfall in December 2050 were then based on a climate change research paper from an ecologist. His study shows how 77% of future cities are very likely to experience a climate that is closer to that of another existing city than to their own current climate. Most notably by 2050, Stockholm’s climate will resemble Budapest, London to Barcelona, and Seattle to San Francisco.

Using these predicted ‘city pairings’ Nestpick were then able to create a rudimentary prediction of snowfall in 2050 by using climate data from the last decade. While the methodology is simplistic, the results highlight a clear trend towards warmer climates in the Northern Hemisphere.

And looking at the UK, it looks like our snow days are set to drop to pretty much just 1 snow day per year, on average. Therefore, the fantasy of snow days with thick, fresh snow building larger than life snowmen might become a thing of the past!

What are your thoughts on Christmas 2050? Do you envisage a white Christmas with futurisitic decorations and virutal reality guests?

Let me know!

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